I sure as heck am. Stewie Mandel over at SI lists the top ten defining games coming up this season, two of which involve Texas:

4. Oklahoma vs. Texas, Oct. 11. While it’s no guarantee the two Red River rivals will make it to their Shootout unscathed — Oklahoma faces early challenges from Cincinnati, Washington and TCU; Texas faces old nemesis Arkansas — they’re still likely to be vying for no less than a Big 12 championship. Between them, the two schools have won five of the past six crowns (though the Sooners claimed all but one of those).

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7. Texas at Texas Tech, Nov. 1. The schedule sets up favorably for the Red Raiders — who return QB Graham Harrell, WR Michael Crabtree and eight other starters on offense — to make a run at their first Big 12 South title, but to do so they’ll almost certainly have to snap their five-game losing streak to the Longhorns. The ever-outspoken Mike Leach claims poor officiating contributed to the past two defeats.

By the way, ESPN recently voted both Texas’s victory over USC in the 2006 Rose Bowl as the best BCS game ever (Texas also held the number 4 spot for its 2005 Rose Victory over Michigan), and Vince Young‘s performance in that game as the best individual BCS performance ever (with his 2005 Rose Bowl performance against Michigan coming in third).

Speaking of his Vinceness, his coach, Jeff Fisher, used VY as an example at the NFL Rookie Symposium this past weekend of just how far the reach of the modern media is:

The first [picture] showed Young posing with fellow participants in a panel discussion during last year’s rookie symposium.

“You recognize the second guy from the left?” Fisher said. “He was here last year, and you know what he talked about? He talked about off-the-field (behavior) … how you guys have got to be really careful because … one little cell phone camera that sends out (photos or video from) here and it ends up here. And guess what? You’re embarrassed.”

Fisher then called for the next slide, taken from photos that recently circulated on the Internet. It was of Young, shirtless and partying. Additional slides showed the quarterback drinking what appeared to be tequila straight from a bottle.

Fisher’s point: The only time an NFL player has a chance to ever truly be considered “off the field” is when he is in the privacy of his home, without any cameras capturing him in compromising situations.

“You are ‘on the field’ when you walk out the front door,” Fisher said.

Thx to Texas Football, Stewie Mandel, and NFL.com

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