Austintacious


"I reckon I'm as American as anyone from Tennessee"

Y’all may have noticed I haven’t posted in the past few weeks, and my absence has been due in part to vacation, and in part due to other considerations as well (read billable hours).

Accordingly, I am signing off for a while. Many thanks for your patronage over this last year and a half or so, and continued success to all of you.

-020033

Longhorn Legends

Barking Carnival has a fascinating comparison of Coaches Royal, Akers, and Brown’s first decades at the Texas helm. Below, I’ve summarized the comparison between DKR and Mack because it is the most competitive and surprising contrast.

Overall Record:

DKR: 82-23-3; 75.2% winning percentage
Mack: 103-25-0; 80.4% winning percentage

Conference Record:

DKR (SWC): 50-15-2; 75.8% winning percentage
Mack (Big 12): 65-15-0; 81.2% winning percentage

Titles:

DKR: 2 outright SWC titles, 2 co-championships, and 1 National Championship
Mack: 3 Big 12 South Division championships, 1 Big 12 Championship, and 1 National Championship

Rankings:

DKR: Top 5 five times (1959, 1961-64); Top 20 two times (1957, 1960)
Mack: Top 5 three times (2001, 2004, 2005); Top 10 two times (2002, 2007); Top 25 five times (1998, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006)

Rivalries:

DKR: vs. OU (8-2); vs. A&M (10-0)
Mack: vs. OU (4-6); vs. A&M (7-3)

While Mack may be rightly knocked for his lackluster performance against Texas’s most hated rivals (excepting of course the bonfire tragedy year agaisnt A&M), no one can seriously challenge Mack’s amazing overall performance, even as compared to one of the college game’s greatest coaches.

One other thing Mack has accomplished that is unlikely to ever be eclipsed by anyone is having the distinction of winning the “not only the best BCS bowl game ever played, but the best college football game ever played … period.” Texas is as lucky to have Mack as it was to have DKR.

The telling comparison will come during the next ten years, as DKR won two more national titles during that span. Let’s see how many more Mack can bring home to Austin.

Thx to Barking Carnival and ESPN’s Big 12 Blog

Keep Austin Weird

Okay, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) thinks no antitrust concerns are rasised by allowing the planet to be served by only one satellite radio company, but allowing the merger of two niche, patchouli-oil-scented grocery store chains is just a groovy bridge too far.

A federal district court ruled last August that Austin’s own bohemian bazaar turned corporate giant, Whole Foods, could acquire rival hippie food purveyor, Wild Oats, without hurting competition.

Yesterday, the D.C. Circuit ruled it had had enough of all the free grocery love, reversed the district court, and held that the core customers of each store were “worthy of antitrust protection,” despite their appearance (oh ok, I added that last part).

Because the merger has already gone through in the interim, the likely outcome of the remand–if the court sids with the FTC as expected–is that stores in areas that raise antitrust concerns will likely be divested.

Thx to the Austin Business Journal and the WSJ Law Blog

For the coward pictured below.

About to rue the day

Today, the DPS released the security video of the arsonist who almost succeeded in burning the Governor’s Mansion to the ground.

Anyone with information about the possible identity of the person depicted in the video or picture above is urged to call investigators at:

512-506-2849,
512-506-2861,
512-506-2862, or
Crime at 800-252-8477.

Thx to the Austinist

Closest thing to heaven

My fair city of Austin is notorious for being a stagnant and stale legal market for those young lawyers with the audacity to attempt to practice here. Practice groups at various firms tend to merely jump from one address along Congress to another, instead of firms actually adding to their headcounts.

The stories are legion of uber-qualified attorneys from Biglaw NYC firms and Ivy Law being turned away by the BigLaw and BigTex Austin branches because of the incredible geographical demand Austin perpetually generates. It was rare for BigTex/Law satellites to open entirely new offices in Austin–that is, until now.

It all began in early 2006 when Dechert opened its Austin office with the first group of Dewey (then Ballantine, now LeBoeuf) emigres.

In early 2007 after the shuttering of Jenkens & Gilchrist (which coincidentally, was the subject of our very first post here at the SMSB), Virginia-based Hunton & Williams reopened its Austin office with the remaining Jenkens lawyers who didn’t spin off their own boutiques or join Winstead’s ranks.

Also in 1997, the Arkansas firm of Mitchell Williams opened its doors in Austin, but only began to expand its Austin footprint in May with the acquisition of longtime Austin firm Long Burner Parks & DeLargy.

After the announced closing of the Dewey office earlier this year, the majority of the remaining Dewey alumni headed over to McKool Smith, but three found their way to King & Spalding’s new Austin branch just a few months ago.

Now, word out tonight is that several Akin & Gump lawyers, including the managing partner of the Austin office, are leaving to open Greenberg Traurig‘s Austin satellite on August 1.

While all of these office openings certainly prove the maxim that Austin firms merely trade lawyers instead of adding them, because five new firms now have an entrenched presence here in Austin, it is entirely likely that more capacity for lawyers yearning to live interesting and meaningful lives in the ATL will be created.

As long as they keep Austin Weird, they’re welcome within the City Limits.

Wouldn\'t have it any other way

* * * UPDATE * * *

Due to my own oversight, I neglected to mention the 2007 founding of Yetter & Warden’s (now Yetter, Warden & Coleman) Austin office by several former Weil appellate lawyers, including the national head of their appellate practice group, former Justice Thomas clerk and Solicitor General of Texas, Greg Coleman.

Thx to the Austin Business Journal and Tex Parte Blog

Mightier

UT Law Professor Schiess has an excellent discussion going on over at his Legal-Writing Blog regarding the importance of proper citation to persuasive legal writing.

By way of fair disclosure, I am an avowed adherent to the “tyranny of the inconsequential,” as insisting upon correct citation has been labeled by some less fond of the practice.

From my experience writing for and editing law journals and clerking for judges, one must of course first put forth a cogent argument. But if you then decide to let the citations take care of themselves, you detract from the credibility you have established by your reasoning. You may still win if you have the better argument or more favorable facts, but I–for one–prefer not to engender snickering in my legal reader, no matter what the outcome of the underlying case.

My background is anectdotal and the sample size insufficient from which to draw statistically significant conclusions, but in my experience, lawyers (usually older and more of the trial variety) who deride other lawyers (usually younger and more of the post-trial variety) for their insistence upon employing correct citation format do so because they wouldn’t have the faintest clue how to cite something properly if you simultaneously smacked them upside the head with the Bluebook, the Greenbook (flawed though the 11th ed. may be), and the MUS.

Moreover, those lawyers I’ve encountered who would never bother to check a citation tend to have evidenced similar diligence in their reasoning as well. Back once upon a time, when it was my job to read briefs submitted by others, it was a very rare occurrence indeed when a brief that jumped out at me as being offensively lax in its citation was inversely impressive for its thoughtful analysis. The converse was also true: rarely were briefs that shone with impeccable citation burdened by slovenly reasoning.

Accordingly, I don’t view correct citation as a nice cherry to put on top of an otherwise impressive argument, or a useful complement to cogent analysis, but instead as the most basic demonstration of one’s elemental understanding of persuasive writing. This is particularly true here in Texas, where an improper notation of the subsequent history of an intermediate appellate case can directly impact the precedential weight that must be accorded the cited case.

Once you’ve lost credibility through incorrect citation, it’s hard to get it back through unassailable logic.

Thx to the Legal-Writing Blog

Don\'t Mess With Texas

Don't Mess With Texas

Unhappy with the SCOTUS ruling in Medellin v. Texas, No. 06-984, slip op. (2008 ) that formally recognized our Great State’s award-winning anti-littering slogan of “Don’t Mess With Texas” as official jurisprudential canon, the International Court of Justice attempted to once again force Texas to halt the executions of several Mexican nationals who made the eternally unwise choice of murdering Texans.

The curt reply from Texas to the World Court was, in essence, the same as it was to the Mexican army some one hundred and forty-three years earlier: “Come and Take It!”

Governor Perry‘s Director of Communications, Robert Black, explained:

The world court has no standing in Texas and Texas is not bound by a ruling or edict from a foreign court …. It is easy to get caught up in discussions of international law and justice and treaties. It’s very important to remember that these individuals are on death row for killing our citizens.

Black’s retort reminded me of Gov. Perry’s brilliant press-release-slapping of the EU when it tried to force Texas to halt its use of capital punishment almost a year ago:

230 years ago, our forefathers fought a war to throw off the yoke of a European monarch and gain the freedom of self-determination. Texans long ago decided that the death penalty is a just and appropriate punishment for the most horrible crimes committed against our citizens. While we respect our friends in Europe, welcome their investment in our state and appreciate their interest in our laws, Texans are doing just fine governing Texas.

God I love being a Texan.

Thx to the WSJ Law Blog and the Houston Chronicle

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